Girl gets Seventeen magazine to stop 'Photoshopping'

Seventeen magazine June/July 2012 cover.

Seventeen magazine June/July 2012 cover.

QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 3:50 PM ET

A 14-year-old girl in Maine has convinced teen juggernaut Seventeen magazine to stop digitally altering its models to make them look skinny and blemish-free.

Grade 8 student Julia Bluhm was inspired to action by the lamentations of her fellow ballet dancers in Waterville.

"On a daily basis I hear comments like: 'It's a fat day,' and 'I ate well today, but I still feel fat.' Ballet dancers do get a lot of flack about their bodies, but it's not just ballet dancers who feel the pressure to be 'pretty'. It's everyone," Bluhm wrote in her online petition.

"Here's what lots of girls don't know. Those 'pretty women' that we see in magazines are fake. They're often photoshopped, air-brushed, edited to look thinner, and to appear like they have perfect skin (sic)."

Bluhm joined forces with SPARK, a U.S. charity that fights the sexualization of young girls in the media, to promote her petition asking the magazine to print one unaltered picture of a girl every issue.

"I want to see regular girls that look like me in a magazine that's supposed to be for me," it reads.

After the petition netted more than 84,000 signatures, SPARK activists hand-delivered it to Seventeen's editors.

Seventeen did them one better than one "regular" girl a month. The teen magazine promised not to alter the body size or face shape of any of any of its models and to feature "a diverse range of beauty in its pages."

"Seventeen listened! They're saying they won't use photoshop to digitally alter their models! This is a huge victory, and I'm so unbelievably happy (sic)," Bluhm wrote on her petition at Change.org.

Bluhm and SPARK are now going after Teen Vogue, asking them to match Seventeen's pledge. As of Tuesday afternoon, that petition had just over 1,700 signatures.


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